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Preserved: Pink Lemonade Curd

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[Photographs: Emily Teel]

There's something iconic about lemonade. It makes me think of poster board and markers, friendly neighbors and the pint-sized but powerful entrepreneurial ambitions of my sister and I as children. In autumn, these ambitions meant raking leaves, in winter shoveling snow, and in spring, door-to-door salesmanship of whatever trinkets our parents could be persuaded to part with. But summer lemonade sales always represented the biggest quarter of our fiscal year.

Though my entrepreneurial ambitions have shifted slightly, I still crave lemonade when the temperature hovers in the 90s. Drinking vinegars, agua frescas, and countless varieties of sun tea may be the trendy new beverages, but they'll never replace it as my true hero of summer. I want intense lemony flavor dressed up with something sophisticated, but not so embellished that it loses sight of straightforward sweet yet tart refreshment. I've made versions with blueberries, lavender, verbena, and tamarind, but my favorite variation is shockingly pink, made so by the juice of crushed raspberries.

I was already planning to mix up a batch when raspberries appeared at my farmers market, but then, from the next stall over, I received a gift of beautiful eggs from a farmer friend. Sun-soaked summer days meant that her hens had been particularly prodigal and she pressed the carton into my hand, insisting that she already had more than she knew what to do with. Faced with the gorgeous, multicolored eggs I shifted gears from the near instant gratification of a pitcher of lemonade to something that would keep these flavors for me to share and enjoy in January, when raspberries are a dream and a 90-degree day would be a welcome change from winter.

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The result is this Pink Lemonade Curd. It combines the richness of those beautiful eggs with lemon and raspberries for drama. Since canning always requires the tedium of sterilizing jars and boiling a kettle, I've kept this recipe as simple as possible. No separating of eggs, just cooking them whole in a double boiler with sugar, lemon, raspberry juice, and a splash of vanilla.

About the Author: Emily Teel is a loud-talking food writer and recipe developer in Philadelphia, where she's the food columnist for Grid Magazine. She recently returned from Parma, Italy, where she completed a Master of Arts in Food Culture and Communications at the University of Gastronomic Sciences. A 2011 Legacy Award Winner with the women's culinary organization Les Dames D'Escoffier International, she's passionate about food and committed to the idea that everyone deserves access to meals that are both nourishing and satisfying. Follow along on twitter @brotherly_grub and see more of her work at EmilyTeel.com

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