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[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

I may be out of touch here, but when did we get so many kinds of Oreos? I mean, peanut butter and mint were weird enough, but now what—we have to contend with anemic "golden" Oreos, snack cakey "cakesters," and Frankensteinian triple doubles? Where do we draw the line?

I wouldn't so much mind the Oreo novelty invasion, but they're starting to hit me where it hurts. The most basic Oreo my grocery store sells is Double Stuff; the classic Oreo is gone.

This isn't to say I don't enjoy innovation with my Oreos; I just prefer to do the innovating myself. After spending a recent afternoon dipping Oreos into a mug of milky coffee, and going through yet another caffeine and sugar high rant about how coffee and chocolate combined ARE THE BEST THING EVER, I decided to try the mix as ice cream. Well, first I took a nap. Then ice cream. Long story short: it's a keeper.

This recipe calls for Tahitian vanilla bean, which tastes especially fragrant and creamy. It takes the slightly bitter edge off the coffee and cocoa-rich Oreo cookies, resulting in an ice cream that tastes of your childhood, but if your parents were cool enough to let you drink coffee. Don't expect a full-on coffee buzz; this is coffee and vanilla working together as one, so it's still gentle enough for kids. The texture is pure rich dairy, with the slightly elastic chew that comes from proper premium ice cream. It's the richness you've always wanted from cookies 'n cream but so rarely find.

So yes, try this ice cream for the cookies and cream experience you've deserved all these years. And if you're listening, Nabisco, this isn't an invitation to make coffee flavored Oreos. You can leave that to us.

Get the Recipe

Coffee 'N Cookies 'N Cream Ice Cream »

About the author: Max Falkowitz writes Serious Eats' weekly Spice Hunting column. He's a proud native of Queens, New York, will do just about anything for a good cup of tea, and enjoys long walks down the aisles of Chinese groceries. You can follow him on Twitter at @maxfalkowitz.

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