Slideshow: Gingerbread House Hack: How to Make One with Graham Crackers

Shapes
Shapes
The basic structure requires nine graham crackers total. Three whole sheets will be set flat against the ground and connected long edge to long edge to form the base. Each side wall is 3/4 of a full graham cracker (break off the top along the perforation in the cracker) set sideways. The front and back of the house are made by carefully cutting a single cracker into a triangular point at one end. Lay the cracker on a flat surface then line up a very sharp chef's knife along a line that starts at the halfway point of one side and finishes about 3/4 of an inch from the top of the cracker along the center line. Carefully cut through by slowly rocking the knife (if the cracker breaks, you can always glue it back together with some frosting). Repeat the same angle on the other side. The roof of the house is made with two more full crackers.
Frosting mortar
Frosting mortar
Open up the zipper-lock bag and place it in a large mug or a 2-cup to 1-quart measure. Flip the top of the bag inside out over the lip of the cup (this will help keep things neat and clean). Spoon a couple cups of frosting into the bag, then re-invert the top and seal it, pressing out as much air as possible. Shake the bag so all the frosting collects near one bottom tip. Snip off a tiny hole from the bottom tip of the bag to pipe out the frosting from that corner. The fatter the hole, the thicker it'll come out, and you don't want it too thick for clean lines here.
Build the walls
Build the walls
Set down the three full graham sheets for the foundation using a line of frosting as the adhesive between each. Stand up the sides of your house by beginning with a front piece and a side piece, using mortar along all the joints and holding them for 10 seconds until they stand on their own.

Carefully add the other sides using a minimal amount of frosting until the whole structure is standing. We're almost ready to decorate, except we wouldn't be protected at this point from a confectioner's sugar snowfall.

Kenji's house
Kenji's house
Did you know Kenji has an architecture degree from MIT? His mom says he majored in Arts and Crafts and... it's true. You can tell from his perfectly engineered graham chimney and mini graham doghouse for Hambone. He went with green Apple Jacks for outdoor decor and some red-dyed frosting (we made a few colored frosting bags along with the white). For the shingle roof look, he lined some more cereal, also found on Leandra's table of miscellaneous cereals, along with coffee beans. That's a popcorn tree on the right side, where the pops are connected via green frosting.
Aerial view
Aerial view
We hadn't checked weather.com but a heavy snowfall took place right after building these. For perfectly even snow coverage, shake your confectioner's sugar out of a a sifter when sprinkling it over your home. Now, if you look real closely here, you can also see foot prints approaching the house a mini snow angel.
Erin's house
Erin's house
I went for a minimalist look with dried seaweed. That's a seaweed roof under the snow (note: seaweed thatching is a real thing in Denmark) and a seaweed lawn out front. The wreath is also made of seaweed accented with a licorice rope bow.