Serious Entertaining: Royal Wedding Party

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[Photographs: Carrie Vasios]

British newspapers are estimating that up to one billion people world-wide will watch the Royal Wedding on Friday. What's that? Not you? You're not going to buy a big, festooned English hat and make a pot of tea and watch two beautiful royal love-birds tie the knot? Well I don't believe you.

Even if you (claim to) think this is all a big hoopla over nothing, consider this: It's another excuse for a party. And shame on you for denying anyone the right to turn one more ordinary day into an extraordinary excuse to eat scones.

One point on which I can sympathize is that to watch the wedding live, Americans will have to get up at 4 a.m. or earlier. So here are some British wedding treats to serve your bleary eyed guests.

McVities Scones

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As I mentioned in a previous post about the Chocolate Biscuit Cake, I really applaud William for not only getting his own cake, but getting such a silly biscuity mound of chocolaty goodness on the table at Buckingham Palace. In honor of those very same biscuits, I've made whole wheat scones with a silky chocolate glaze. A touch of honey and dash of salt complete the toasted oat flavor.

Fruitcake Muffins

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Speaking of ridiculous requests, the bride chose a fruitcake to be the main wedding cake. I suppose there's no better way to say "I'm the Queen now!" than by forcing your guests to eat the very (and possibly only) cake that most people despise.

The truth is I happen to like fruitcake. So, like their namesake, these muffins are dense and eggy with a hint of vanilla. There is just enough batter to hold together a melange of candied fruits including glace cherries, dates, raisins, and candied orange peel.

Marmalade Bread

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Why marmalade bread? Why not. This chunky bitter orange jam is a British favorite and it lends an aromatic sweetness to a moist, dense wheat loaf. Spread with butter or even more jam, it's a perfect, comforting slice to eat with a cup of tea.

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